Simon Eckersley

Simon is a specialist criminal practitioner with an emphasis on complex and serious defence work; often on a privately funded basis.

He is regularly instructed in the following areas:

  • Serious and Organised Drugs;
  • Rape and Child Sexual Abuse;
  • Manslaughter (unlawful act and gross negligence);
  • Murder and Attempted Murder;
  • Serious and Complex Fraud;
  • Serious Violence.

Simon is known for his meticulous preparation, especially in paper heavy and complex cases. He is often used to represent demanding clients.

Simon is currently instructed in a number of Trading Standards prosecutions, offering advice from an early stage.

Solicitors and other practising lawyers are invited to contact the clerks on: +44 (0)115 824 9090

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Simon Eckersley

Simon spends his leisure time with his family. He enjoys gardening, woodwork, poetry, the occasional round of golf, watching all forms of sport and good food and wine. He is an avid cyclist and triathlete, competing in distances up to Ironman. He sometimes falls off.

Inn: Lincoln’s Inn
Degree: BA (Hons) Oxon

Recommendations

Recorder (Crime) North Eastern Circuit – 2016
Recorder – Serious Sexual Offences - 2017
Facilitator – ‘Advocacy and the Vulnerable’ (Midland Circuit)

Affiliations

Midland Circuit Criminal Bar Association

Recent Cases

R v Fesenko – Operation ‘Silentpool IV’. (Current instructions). A 3-month, 9-handed trial at Birmingham Crown Court. Conspiracy to supply class A drugs. Said to be the largest cocaine conspiracy seen in the Midlands.
R v Swift (2020) – Operation ‘Encyclic’. 5-handed class A drug conspiracy. The case was resolved after negotiation limiting the client’s role and significantly reducing his sentence.
R v Price (2019). Operation ‘Xylographer’. A 17-handed, 3-month class A drug conspiracy at Nottingham Crown Court. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v HS (2019). The defence of a 17-year old French National who embarked on a series of sexual attacks (including rape) in Lincoln.
R v Thomas Ball (2019) – Possession of Explosives – the trial involved an ‘Aladdin’s cave of criminality’.
R v RS (2019). Alleged historical sexual abuse of a family friend. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v SP (2019). Allegations of rape made by two women – one recent and one historical – involving similar facts. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v RT (2019). Privately paid defence in relation to allegations of historical sexual abuse of the defendant’s stepdaughter. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v Slatcher (2019). Allegation of death by careless driving. The case involved careful analysis of video evidence and lengthy cross-examination of expert witnesses. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v KM (2019) – Gloucester Crown Court. A 4-handed, 4-week trial in relation to allegations of child cruelty said to be amongst the worst heard by a criminal court. The defendant was acquitted of the most serious allegation, significantly reducing his sentence.
R v JW (2019) – Stafford Crown Court. Allegation of rape of a child. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v RM (2019) – Lincoln Crown Court. Allegation of rape of a stranger with the issue being consent. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v Ahmed (2018). A 3-month immigration conspiracy at Manchester Crown Court. The case involved the abuse of the Home Office Tier 4 Temporary Migration programme which allows genuine students from outside the European Union to obtain permission to enter the United Kingdom for the purpose of study at an approved educational establishment. The client was acquitted on the direction of the judge at the end of the prosecution case.
R v Knowland (2018) (junior) – Allegation of murder by a man obsessed with the actor Jonny Depp. Client was acquitted of murder and convicted of manslaughter after a week-long trial.
Other noted cases:
R v French (2017) A 6-week Class A drug conspiracy trial at Birmingham Crown Court. The client was unanimously acquitted.
R v Richardson (2017) (Junior) – Murder, pleaded acceptably to manslaughter. The defendant had significant learning difficulties and there was significant expert medical evidence involved in negotiating the plea.
R v Khan (2017) – 15-handed class A drug conspiracy. The client was the first on the indictment.
R v Lowther (2017) – Multi-handed conspiracy to blackmail and money-laundering.
R v Usher (2017) – Stafford Crown Court. a 3 ½ month trial involving conspiracy to kidnap / blackmail / robbery / PCJ. The client was unanimously acquitted of the matters before the jury.
R v Maling (2016) – (junior) – Unlawful Act Manslaughter. This case involved significant background evidence of drug and alcohol abuse and previous domestic violence.
R v Miah (2016) – human trafficking / modern slavery – where the defendants trafficked women into the UK to be exploited as sex workers.
R v Jacks (2016) – Fraudulent Trading Conspiracy (targeting the vulnerable / elderly re house repairs). This case involved the cross-examination of a large number of elderly and vulnerable witnesses.
R v Peter Eyre (2016) – (junior). Representing the lead defendant in a nationally reported 3-handed allegation of Murder, where a fire resulted in the deaths of three individuals, including a baby.
R v Scrimshaw (2015) – Death by dangerous driving – a highly emotive case where there was the need to delicately balance the defence with the emotional needs of the court.
R v Khan (2015) Represented the lead defendant in a 2-month trial for attempted s18 / Violent Disorder. Cross examination of expert witnesses and careful scrutiny of unused material led to the client’s acquittal on the most serious allegation.
R v Richmond (2015) – Lead defendant in 5-week trial for conspiracy to produce cannabis / money laundering. Having represented the client previously and negotiated the acceptance of a plea to simple possession where he was found in excess of 300 plants; the allegation was that he ‘atomised’ his production to a series of buy-to-lets where he created a series of fictitious tenancies.
R v Jepson (2015) – modern slavery, involving the systematic abuse of a vulnerable male.
R v Durrant (2015) – drug conspiracy / money laundering.
R v Nguyen (2015) – Lead defendant in an allegation of conspiracy to kidnap / blackmail relating to the production of cannabis and money laundering.
R v Dickinson – [2014] – (junior) – multi-handed Murder where the defendants kicked and stamped on a vulnerable male whilst fuelled by drink and drugs.
R v Ankle – [2014] – Multi-handed drug conspiracy involving the large-scale transportation of cocaine across county lines.
R v Eke – [2013] – Multi-handed fraudulent marriage.
R v Carl Powell [2012] - Junior defence counsel in the nationally reported case of the sexually motivated murder of Caroline Coyne.
R v Mkamdawire and others [2012] - Defence counsel for one of 16 defendants involved in a conspiracy to steal high value and prestige vehicles and transport them to Africa for onward distribution.
R v Robinson and others [2012] - Defence counsel for one of the ‘Nottingham Rioters’ said to have attacked Canning Circus Police Station with firebombs during the National spate of rioting. Of a large number of defendants, was one of only six who went on to have a trial.
R v Rowley and others [2012] - Defence counsel for one defendant charged in relation to a large-scale fraud alleged to have been perpetrated against the DWP, said to involve over 100 individuals.
R v Claxton [2011] - Defence counsel representing a client charged with the Attempted Murder of his partner. As both parties were alcoholics and had significant involvement with the police, the resulting third-party disclosure triggered detailed legal argument in relation to Bad Character Evidence.
R v B [2011] - Defending in a case involving a historical allegation of rape and sexual assault, committed over a period of nearly two decades, against multiple complainants. The case involved advice and argument in relation to substantial social services disclosure (directly leading to acquittal on specific counts) as well as the cross examination of vulnerable complainants.